July 7

Spider-Man, 1977

Welcome True Believers to another all new episode of Saturday Night Movie Sleepovers! This week J. Blake and Dion Baia are talking a character that is a personal favorite of the boys- particularly J. Blake -and with a new film hitting theaters this week, what better time then to discuss a certain New York City Web-Slinger! That’s right, your ‘friendly neighborhood Spider-Man‘ is the topic and his journey through television with an emphasis on the 1977 TV movie entitled just Spider-Man, and the live-action series that blossomed out of that movie pilot, The Amazing Spider-Man, which ran from 1978 to 1979.

Spider-man

With such a huge topic to cover, the boys initially set out to only talk the 1970’s live-action series but decided they needed to touch on the original 1967 Spider-Man cartoon series that ran until 1970, as well as the first live-action appearance of the character which appeared on of all places, PBS, on 1970’s series The Electric Company. They also felt compelled to discuss the little known, but amazing (no pun intended… or maybe it was…) live-action Japanese TV show entitled Spider-Man (or Supaidâman) that ran from 1978-1979, coinciding with the live-action America series. The fellas do touch upon the other iterations of Spidey in his various animated forms but set up the conversation by going into how much of an influence the character was for Blake growing up, even as far as a very young Blake (with the help of his Mom) submitting Spider-Man artwork to Marvel in hopes of becoming an artist there. The boys then go through the history of the character: summing up comics in the Golden Age, specifically pre and post war; Timely / Atlas Comics’ evolution into Marvel Comics; and Stan Lee‘s fight to breakout of the then-standard storytelling molds for comic books of the day, to be able to tell new kinds of stories that humanize the characters portrayed within. From the 1967 cartoon and appearances on The Electric Company, they dive deep into the 1977 TV movieBackdoor Pilot‘ (as it was called), to the last two-part episode of that series in 1979 called The Chinese Web, released theatrically later as The Dragon’s Challenge overseas. They also breakdown the pilot to the 1978 Japanese show and try to put into words how much the Japanese show blew their minds… So could it be argued that Spider-Man‘s origin story is in fact more tragic than Batman‘s? How does the life-action adaptations from the 70’s hold up? And just how freaking amazing is the Japanese show really? Well make sure you grab some extra web cartridges, your camera and pack a lunch, cause we’re swinging through the glass and cement canyons of New York City this week in an all new and exciting installment of Saturday Night Movie Sleepovers!

Excelsior!!!

*(This podcast was recorded prior to the passing of Stan Lee’s wife, Joan. Our thoughts and deepest condolences go out to Mr. Lee and his family.)

EXTRAS:

Take a look at Blake’s Turkish Spider-Man poster for the theatrical release of The Dragon’s Challenge, signed by Stan Lee! AND here is the American edition of that same poster.

As brought up in the podcast, here is a link to the Society of Illustrators‘ current exhibit on The Art of Spider-Man.

Check out the original 1977 ‘Backdoor Pilot’ TV movie that greenlit the 1970’s series, courtesy of YouTube

Here’s Stan Lee talking about why he disliked the 1978-79 American television series.

Have a look at the great opening for the 1978-79 Japanese series, with subtitles!

And if you didn’t believe the boys about the awesomeness of the Japanese series, have a look at this trailer for it’s re-release from Marvel.com!

For anyone who didn’t know or forgot this existed, please check out the full video of How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way, from 1986, starring Stan Lee and John Buscema!

Also discussed in the podcast, have a listen to Michael Bublé‘s great big band cover of the 1967 animated series theme, which starts as Sing Sing Sing and segues into Spider-Man. And to the show how popular this rarity must of been overseas, check out this live version with stage show, on Italian TV!

June 2

Teen Wolf, 1985 – SNMS Presents: SNMGuestovers

This week Blake welcomes a very special guest — the always charming Patrick Bromley of F This Movie  to partake in part 2 of an exciting, podcast-spanning 1985 werewolf extravaganza! In part 1, Blake joins Patrick on the F This Movie podcast to discuss one of his favorite films, SILVER BULLET (which can be found HERE). And for this glorious installment of the “SNMS Presents” series, Patrick brings his love for all things Michael J. Fox to the table, as he and Blake get a little personal while discussing the finer points of the sleepover classic, TEEN WOLF.

Patrick and Blake begin the show by reminiscing about their first viewings of TEEN WOLF before diving into an in-depth discussion about the making of the film, its post BACK TO THE FUTURE release, infamous sequel, Saturday Morning Cartoon spin-off, characters, message and most importantly…the eye-opening & life-changing revelation that Patrick had upon this latest viewing. He may never be the same again!

So what does the newly coined term “Chasing Boof” mean? How many times do the boys manage to say the word “Boof” in this episode? What is the moral of this crazy 80s comedy about a basketball-playing teenaged werewolf? Are Pam & Boof the 80s’ equivalent of “Betty & Veronica?” Has Blake finally found his 21 Jump Street-loving soulmate? Was it really out of fashion to give somebody the nickname “Chunk” by the early 1990s? Which childhood crush, of both Blake and Patrick’s, almost starred in a third TEEN WOLF movie? All of these questions and more are answered in this very special, podcast crossover installment of SNMS PRESENTS: SATURDAY NIGHT MOVIE GUESTOVERS!!!

Check out Patrick & Blake discussing 1985’s SILVER BULLET by CLICKING HERE.

Follow @patrickbromley and @FThisMovie on Twitter!

Check out the opening to the TEEN WOLF cartoon by CLICKING HERE.

Check out Patrick & Blake’s favorite scene from the movie by CLICKING HERE.