August 26

Falling Down, 1993

Dion Baia and J. Blake are back for another must-listen to edition of Saturday Night Movie Sleepovers! The dog days of summer are wrapping up for the boys in the mean streets of the asphalt jungle, and they had the perfect film to cover at the end of August. This week they take on an urban classic, something near and dear to a generation of film goers, Joel Schumacher‘s Falling Down, starring Michael Douglas as William D-Fens Foster, from 1993.

Falling Down

Truly a poster child film for the frustrated 9-5 worker who is fed up with their job and maybe the system in general, Blake and Dion figured this would be a great movie to wrap up this hot and steamy summer season. They get right into it and chat about how the film almost became a TV movie because of Hollywood’s passing on the script due to the controversial content. They also frame the historical context of the era it was released within, hitting on the recent recession at the time, as well as the LA riots that occurred in the Spring of 1992 (while the film was being shot). They discuss the amazing choice of casting, the fantastic Michael Douglas and once again discuss the importance of the likeability of an actor playing a role, for the audience to be on board and like that character. Dion and Blake chat about the D-Feds character and if he’s actually the protagonist or perhaps the antagonist. And they compare him to his foil in the film, Detective Prendergast, played by the legendary Robert Duvall and how they both cope with the stress of daily life. They also discuss how this story translates to today’s audience; not just by how Douglas’ character is perceived and the glorification of some of his actions, but also how modern audiences in today’s highly politically correct environment may even jump to conclusions without fully understanding the context of the era, not only of 1993, but cinema in general and the background of D-Fens as a character. Well it’s a rip-roaring blast for the lads in this fun and exciting, all new episode of Saturday Night Movie Sleepovers! #wolfmansnards

* The David Hasselhoff TV movie Dion periodically references, is in fact called Terror at London Bridge, from 1985.

EXTRAS:

Check out the original trailer for Falling Down.

Now here’s an interesting review circa 1993 by Siskel & Ebert.

For alittle extra reading, have a look at this pretty thought-provoking thread on Reddit, as fans analyze Falling Down.

Take a look at Michael Douglas from the mid 90’s discussing the film with Jimmy Carter.

Have a look at another interview from the era of Michael Douglas discussing his role as D-Feds in Falling Down.

And here’s Barbara Hershey talking about Falling Down.

Here’s a pretty cool mashup music video using Falling Down footage edited to the Iron Maiden song Man On The Edge, which was written as an homage to the original film.

 

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Posted August 26, 2016 by admin in category Action, Adventure, Classic, Crime, Drama, Uncategorized

2 thoughts on “Falling Down, 1993

  1. Jose A. Rivera

    This was an interesting movie. I saw it on cable as a kid and I kind of got it but didn’t get it, at the same time. Also the main character kind of reminded me of my dad in certain frustrations he had with the homeless and gangs…although nowhere NEAR as extreme as Michael Douglas in the movie.

    Funny enough, I think I know what tunnel you’re talking about near 42nd.

    Reply
    1. admin (Post author)

      Thanks for listening Jose and taking the time to drop us a line. Regarding Falling Down, maybe we all can see alittle bit of ourselves (and/or certainly relatives! Ha) in D-Fens, and that could be the sign of a good storytelling; a tale that makes you turn the mirror on one’s self and see frustrations/emotions/desires/etc of a character and discover for better or worse, that we too might exhibit the same characteristics, and to what degree. But anyway, it’s a real pleasure to have you as a listener, so thank you again. We are honored. Peace and props!

      Reply

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