August 4

The Lost Boys, 1987

Hello again and welcome back to another all new episode of Saturday Night Movie Sleepovers! This week Dion Baia and J. Blake are talking another absolute cult classic film that turns 30 this week. A movie about beach boardwalks, teen angst, and of course vampires, Joel Schumacher‘s The Lost Boys from 1987.

The Lost Boys Poster

The boys fondly reminisce about the era The Lost Boys came out within, and how the concept of teenage vampires was a relatively new idea for audiences. Blake and Dion discuss the vampire lore and the ‘classical’ representation these characters had in cinema, and how this film kind of turned that traditional idea on end. They talk about the obvious connections to novelist J.M. Barrie‘s story Peter Pan, as well as the other cultural influences peppered in the story, such as the reoccurring presence of rock icon Jim Morrison and the symbolism invoked, which goes to the greater themes layered within. They discuss the family dynamics in the story, be it the Emerson family’s or the Lost Boys gang themselves. The lads go into the Corey connection, and the relationship between Haim and Feldman that all started with this movie. They compare this film to the novelization, and interject some of the subplots and scenes that were discarded in the final cut of the 1987 movie. And they also chat about the sexual tension between the main characters in the story, and ponder the question: who is really attracted to who here? So, how monumental was The Lost Boys’ soundtrack when it came out? Did director Joel Schumacher maybe put himself a little bit into young Corey Haim‘s character? What’s Blake‘s Billy Wirth story? How about Dion‘s Jason Patric encounter? Well it’s about time that you sharpen those wooden stakes, gather as much Holy Water as you can find, and above all, don’t invite any strangers into your house because an all new edition of Saturday Night Movie Sleepovers is coming your way!

(* The two stories referred to in the podcast that predate Bram Stoker‘s 1897 Dracula, were the 1819 short story entitled The Vampyre by John William Polidori, and the 1872 lesbian vampire novella Carmilla, by Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu– both in public domain and available online free to read.


Check out the original trailer for The Lost Boys!

Watch the deleted scenes, here!

And check out more deleted scenes from the film, here!

Take a look at Corey Haim and Feldman talking about The Lost Boys!

Have a look at the 2004 The Lost Boys 17 year old Retrospective!

October 23

Silver Bullet, 1985 – SNMS Presents: The Side-Casts

For week 4 of SNMS’ epic October Halloween Month of Horror, J. Blake takes the show on the road and does a totally impromptu special Sunday Night Movie Sleepover “Side-Cast” from the nation’s capitol with a cherished old friend, former classmate and fellow sleepover & horror movie enthusiast, Dave…covering one of their all-time favorite 80s horror classics, Silver Bullet (1985).

SIlver Bullet Poster


In this first all new and original edition of SNMS’ “Side-Casts,” Blake calls on Dave’s love and knowledge of Stephen King to help examine this seldom mentioned King penned masterpiece. They discuss King as an author, Cycle of the Werewolf, (the novelette the film is based on) and King’s original screenplay. They discuss how the film is, at its core, really a beautifully executed family drama and marvel at the performances of Gary Busey and the late Corey Haim. They talk about composer Jay Chattaway and the film’s musical score. They explore the werewolf legend as metaphor. Blake tells the bone-chilling story about the first time he ever saw this movie and while under the influence of perhaps one growler of beer too many, the guys get a little deep.

Did Stephen King mean for some the dialogue to be a “tongue in cheek?” How does this film’s take on the werewolf transformation really work? Are we, as an audience, supposed know who the werewolf is before Janie does and are his intentions actually good? How loose is “The Buse” in this movie and why do Blake and Dave love this movie so darn much? Try your best not to “make lemonade in your pants,” because all these questions and more are answered in this special Halloween edition of SNMS’ Side-Casts!


Check out the original trailer!

Here’s a link to the printing of the film’s screenplay Blake and Dave talk about during the podcast.

Here’s a compilation of all of Silver Bullet’s werewolf attacks, by Gorey Bits on youtube.

Take a listen to Jay Chattway’s fantastic score!


Subscribe to SNMS on iTunes!

Listen to SNMS on Stitcher!

Listen to SNMS on Player FM!

November 26

Planes, Trains and Automobiles, 1987

In this week’s Thanksgiving edition of Saturday Night Movie Sleepovers, Dion Baia & J. Blake pick the iconic comedy classic Planes Trains and Automobiles, released on Thanksgiving Eve, 1987.


The boys reminisce about their memories connected with the film, discuss the legendary careers and lasting legacies of writer/producer/director John Hughes and actor John Candy, and the imprint the film made on our culture. They also get into the other comedy films of the 1980’s, and the popular comedy genre films that were big at the time. So please come have a listen to one of the rare Thanksgiving Holiday films, and a comedic classic!

(Check out the only available deleted scene from the film, where Del O. Griffith waxes about various Airline food.)

(Have a look at the various influences Planes, Trains and Automobiles have had on the TV show Family Guy)

*Wagon’s East was in fact the last film John Candy was making in Mexico when he passed away; the forgettable 2010 film Due Date was the comedy released that was compared and questioned as a remake to this 1987 classic.

Category: Classic, Comedy, Holiday, Uncategorized | Comments Off on Planes, Trains and Automobiles, 1987